Restart: June 4, 2020

After restoration work, the clock was restarted today. The date carries special meaning as it is the day on which the clock turns 200 000 days old.

Maintenance Work in April / May 2020

Due to maintenance work on the master clockwork the Astronomical Clock was stopped on April 1, 2020. More than 40 years since the last maintenance, a few things need to be fixed. When it comes to unique historical artifacts like this clock there can be no precise schedule for the duration of the procedure; but expect the standstill to last until the end of May. We are sorry for any inconvenience.

Dedication Remarks for the Launch of This Portal

The Bishop in the Diocese Mecklenburg and Pomerania of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Northern Germany: Tilman Jeremias

In perpetual regularity, the stroke of the pendulum of the Astronomical Clock is heard through Rostock’s St. Mary’s Church. But now we hear the twelve o’clock bell: right on the hour. The original mechanical clockwork, a unique piece worldwide, works with stunning precision. The crowd in front of the clock hold their breath; all eyes go up to where the apostle display begins. Christ raises his hand in blessing all the apostles, except Judas the traitor for whom heaven’s door slams shut at the end of the spectacle.
Now the organ begins to play. Numerous visitors of the church feel invited to pause for some moments of tranquility at the daily noon prayer: ten minutes of reflection marking day’s culmination point.
It is for a good reason that this clock of international standing is located in a church. It calls to prayer. It reminds us of life’s transience and God’s eternity. Each year it fascinates many thousands of visitors and invites them for noon prayer. Let it amaze you, too.

Bishop Tilman Jeremias
21.11.2019
Translation: Fedor Mitschke

The Rector of the University of Rostock: Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Schareck

With the establishment of the university and the time management enabled by an astronomical clock in what was then the university church, St. Mary’s, a new forward-looking era began in this Hanseatic city in the 15th century: in the spirit of tradition as a ‘living flow’, the tradition of innovations.

Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Schareck
Rector of the University of Rostock
15.11.2019
Translation: Fedor Mitschke

The Lord Mayor of the Hanseatic and University City of Rostock: Claus Ruhe Madsen

The Astronomical Clock in St. Mary’s Church is one of the most precious treasures of art in our Hanseatic and University City, and is a mandatory feature of each sight seeing tour in this town. At the same time it illustrates the prosperity of medieval Rostock and the pride of its citizens.
This does not only hold for the time when it was built more than five centuries ago, it is true throughout its entire history. All the time someone was there who took good care of the clock, who  - with considerable expertise and meticulousness - saw to its integrity, kept it in good shape, wound its works. Past centuries were ravaged by war, but thanks to loving care by committed individuals this masterpiece of clockmaking has survived.
It could not be located in any better place than in St. Mary’s, the main church right in the city’s center. This consecrated memorial has not only witnessed the various stages of Rostock’s history – from its founding to the time of the Hanseatic League, the Thirty Year’s War, the Great City Fire of 1677,  Napoleonic Wars, all the way to the two World Wars of the 20th century and the peaceful revolution in the autumn of 1989. And it has seen the intertwined histories of the city and the university that was established here 600 years ago.
With this internet site the clock reveals its secrets to the general public and helps secure its future. I thank all individuals who get involved to maintain the clock: in the past, today, and tomorrow. In doing so they secure this our most precious treasure for the future.

Claus Ruhe Madsen
Lord Mayor of the Hanseatic and University City of Rostock
Rostock, 13.11.2019
Translation: Fedor Mitschke

November 12, 2019: Public Launch of this Database

The University of Rostock was established in 1419 and was opened on Nov. 12 of that same year with a ceremony in St. Mary’s Church. On the same day of this current year 2019, the university celebrates its 600-year anniversary. Also on that same day, this database is made available to the general public.

The Astronomical Clock inside St. Mary’s Church in Rostock exists since 1472. Numerous documents regarding its construction, its history, its operation and its perception have existed scattered among several people and institutions. The Rostock Astronomical Clock is an important monument of cultural history, and therefore it is appropriate to make these documents available to the general public for their perusal and information.

Is the database now “complete”? No! First, we continually scout for further documents, determine their copyright owners and inquire for permission to use the document. If granted, we insert the document into the database. Second, there is an internal area in which we collect relevant documents for which we either do not have copyright permission, or which are of an unsuitable nature for public display (like personal letters). And thirdly, more documents of interest will surely be created in the future. This is why such a database can never be “complete”.

Should you have documents that might be of relevance for the database and that are not yet listed here, we appreciate to hear from you at: WEBMASTER.

Check this space for information concerning future special events. For example, Rostock Astronomical Clock will soon be 550 years old; a report about the celebration is planned to appear here. Stay tuned!

At the Press Conference for Public Launch of this Database, 12.11.2019. Left to right: Andrija Neskovic, Prof. Fedor Mitschke, Prof. Andreas Heuer, Rector Prof. Wolfgang Schareck. Photo: W. Fehlberg